USF Housing LIVE! – 303

USF Housing LIVE! – 303


[Background Music] Sierra Rose. Gregory Bowers. Dasha Antipova. Stephanie Jochman. Kevin Mahoney. Jac Dickens. Yeraldine Paredes. Max Morinelli. Nicole Yacura. February 28, 2017. Coming to you from the beautiful
University of South Florida campus in Tampa,
this is USF Housing Live!! Hey, everyone, are we live? [Yes.] Okay. That’s the most awkward
intro we’ve ever had. [Laughter] Normally, everyone
gives us some love, and so, Hey, we’re here at
Housing Live, everyone! We are there. [Applause] And so
it was really fun. Off camera, we’ve got–We have
Jack who’s our cue person, and everyone is so intently
watching the opening that we just came live
and we’re like, “Oh, wait. We’re doing a show.”
So now that we’re here, my name is Gregory Bowers at
Housing Residential Education, here at the beautiful University
of South Florida in Tampa. our motto at housing
is best place to live, best place to work,
best place to learn. We’ve got an incredible
panel of guests tonight. We’ll just run down
the line real fast. Kate Ashmore from the Honors
Living Learning Community. Welcome, Kate. Thank you very much,
I’m glad to be here. Glad to have you. And next up, we’ve got Monica
Miranda from the Center for Student Involvement and
Fraternity and Sorority Life. Welcome. Thank you. I’m glad to be here. And last, but not least,
but certainly tallest, we have the Dave Kloiber from Housing and Residential
Education Assignments. Dave, welcome. It’s a pleasure, Greg. This is like your
hundredth show, right Dave? Maybe. Alright. Me, too. We’re glad to have you back. Play your cards right, you just
might get to come back again. Thank you. Alright. For those of you watching,
we talk about this being live for a big reason. By being live, you can
engage with us in real time, send us your questions
on Facebook or Youtube. For those of you
viewing on Youtube, there are a couple steps to
make sure you can log in and ask your questions while
we are live on the air. So we’re going to roll
a short video for you. We’d be right back
with Kate Ashmore from the Honors Live
and Learn Community after this. [Sort] If you have a Youtube account,
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you are now signed into Youtube with your Google account. Now that you are signed in,
please make Rocky happy and subscribe. You can do this on our
Youtube channel page, or below the video player. We’re back. I am Gregory Bowers at
Housing Residential Education, and so we’re just
talking about out opener. We think it’s better than
what happened at the Oscars, and so we win! Alright, so we’re speaking
with Kate Ashmore from the Honors Living
Learning Community. Kate, welcome to the program. Tell us, who are you? And what do you do here? So I’m Kate Ashmore, and I work with the Honors
Living Learning Community, what we call the
Honors LLC for short, and I am the person who helps
coordinate the communication between students and the
faculty, the honors college, and the staff of the
honors college to make sure everyone’s
on the same page. So you get lots of emails
from me when you live there, and I’m definitely keeping
you guys up to date. We also help
coordinate programs and events to keep
our students engaged, and to help them succeed
while they’re here at USF. Awesome. And so thinking
of the Honors LLC, there are a lot of students
out there watching, and a number of parents, why
should a student choose to live in the Honors Living
Learning Community? I think the top reason that I
have heard is that it really does feel like a community,
and even more so like a family. When we ask students,
“What’s the one word that you would use to
describe the Honors LLC?” they say “family,” and
they say “community, ” and they say “connected. And so they just really
feel like they’re getting the best possible experience from the Living
Learning Community, and we are there to foster
that and to really grow that. So we’re here to make sure
that students feel successful in their academics,
and their personal growth, and their professional growth,
because we want them to be a full well-rounded student
while they’re here. Awesome. And so, just to discern,
because I’ve heard from some students before
where they think if they’re in the Honors College,
they’re automatically living in the Honors Living
Learning Community, is that true? No. So there is an
application process. We encourage all of our Honors
LLC–Honors College students to apply to live
in the Honors LLC, but there is limited space. So getting your application in
early is the best way to ensure that you get to live
where you want to live. We also welcome provost-scholar
program students, and Holcombe Jenkins Scholars, and the last one is the
National Merit scholars. And so sometimes
there’s overlap, but we welcome all
those types of students to fill out the application. Excellent. Excellent. And so, one thing that
I was wandering about it the focus community aspect
of the Honors LLC. What is a focus community? So the focus community is we’re
kicking off this coming fall, so all of our incoming
students and our returners would be the inaugural class
in our brand new building, and so the focus community
is there’s going to be two. One is called
Educate and Create, and the other is
Build and Innovate. Educate and Create is for
students who’re interested in education and creation,
but also education as far as–Maybe not
so like just the teaching, but also educational theory,
educational law. So all of these
different aspects. In addition, we have students
interested in creative works. So artists, photographers,
fashion designers, musicians–Whatever
your interest is, we really want to
encourage you to explore that while you’re here,
so we’re creating spaces for students to come together. And then the other space
is Build and Innovate, and that is for people who
are interested in technology, and building,
and architecture, and new and upcoming
technologies and innovations. So we’re really trying
to encourage you, and we’re going to provide
resources to help to actually facilitate that exploration. And these communities are
not limited to your major. So if you’re an
Education student, and you want to be in Build
and Innovate, go for it. If you’re a Pre-Med student,
or an Engineer, and you want to join in with
the musicians in the Educate and Create, we’re more than
happy to have you there. That is very, very cool. And so this is going to
manifest itself in physical spaces inside the
residence hall, right? Exactly. So one of the greater things
about our building, Summit Hall, is that on every single
floor there’s going to be an activity lounge,
and a quiet lounge. And so on two of the floors,
we’re going to create–One activity lounge
would be dedicate to Educate and Create,
and on the other floor, there would be–The activity
lounge would be dedicated to build and innovate. And so that space would
actually be fitted out to look like, and to
have resources there for those students to utilize. Awesome. That’s excellent. So–And I heard you
mention at the opening here, so you said Sommet Halls are
going to have the Honors LLC next year, right? Yes. So for those of you watching,
that’s in the village. The brand new buildings that
are still being constructed, they’ll be fresh
and new for them then, living in the Honors LLC. Yes. They will be the
inaugural class there too. So they would be the
first ones that get to live in those spaces, and I’m really, really
excited to see how that looks, and how the new community
feels when we move over there. That’s awesome. I’m really excited
to hear about that. I hope I can live there,
I’ll be someone’s roommate if they let me in. So, we’ll see. Tell me, what makes this
experience special for the residents living
in the Honors LLC? I’m trying to think back to
some of what our students have told us, and different things. I know that there are
just like really–Usually, it’s like one experience. So one of our students would
tell us that on moving day, you move all your stuff in,
and you did the Bull Haul, and you’re in your dorm here. Like your parents are
gone, and you’re like, what do you do. And they actually had
students that were in there on their floor who were like, “Hey, do you want to
go play video games?” And so that night, the very
first night they moved in, they were there
playing Mario Cart. And so there was just that
community feel from the get-go. So I think that that is
really what makes it a special place to
live on campus. That’s really cool. And so we have a lot of
parents watching as well. And so do you have any
advice for parents as they prepare their children for
this transition to college? I think it can be
hard to let go, and to really believe
that your student is going to be okay here. And so I would encourage
parents to realize that there are a lot of staff
that have been trained here to really support those
students in their transition; you can always connect
with your student. And I think it’s really
important as a parent to show your student that
you believe in them, and that you believe that
they’re going to have a great experience, because that
makes a world of difference. Excellent. Well, Kate, thank you
so much for coming on the program tonight. Yeah. You’re very welcome. I’m glad to be here. And of course, for
all of you–Those of you who are watching, Kate’s still
going to be up here. The whole panel is here,
so if you have questions about the Honors LLC
during the program, just type in the comments, they’ll send them to
me right on the set; we’ll answer you in real time. First, we’ve got a
few videos for you, and then we’re going to
speaking with Monica Miranda from the Center for Student Involvement & Fraternity/Sorority Life. So roll those clips, we’d
be right back with more USF Housing Live,
after this. Hey guys, I’m CJ Watkins. My parents are in the military
so I’ve been traveling around my whole life. I went to high school on the
border of Germany and The Netherlands, but my
parents were from Florida. So I’ve always kind of had
a weird attachment to there. My first impression of USF was
how beautiful the campus was. I noticed there was
so much wildlife too. There was definitely more
of a connection than the other schools
that I had to visit. The orientation team leaders,
they made me feel a lot more welcome. There was a lot of
school spirit, too. And that was something
that really stayed with me. I loved homecoming week,
there’s always something to do. The week of welcome
was pretty nice; I’d never really seen
something like that before. One of the best things
about USF would definitely have to be how diverse
with our culture is. I met people from
around the world and was even able to meet
someone from my own high school. Make sure that you visit this
school you’re looking at, because you may look online,
or get all the letters in, or fill out the applications. And then you visit there,
and you don’t really have that same connection. In high school, you kind of
have your parents or your teachers tell you to do this
or that, but with college, it’s definitely self-reliant. You’re going to be doing
95% of the work on your own. And so it’s really important
that you stay grounded to make sure you’re completing
your assignments on time, and that you go to class. Alright, and we are back. So now we’re speaking
with Monica Miranda from the Center for Student Involvement &
Fraternity/Sorority Life. Monica, how are
you doing tonight? I’m doing great. Glad to be here. Well, thank you
for coming back. I know you were
with us last season, I’m very happy to have
to return to the show. Me too. So can you tell us,
who are you? And what do you do here? So as you said,
my name is Monica Miranda, and I serve as the
Director for the Center for Student Involvement &
Fraternity/Sorority Life. And what I do is really,
I get to have a lot of fun with a great team of people
who are dedicated to making sure that students have
transformational experiences and opportunities to
get involved and engaged in the life of the campus, in the life of
their university, in programs and activities,
in organizations, in research, and helping them find
their paths to involvement here on campus. And so should students be
involved outside of the classroom around here? Absolutely, Greg! [Chuckles] So why is that? Well–And I’ll tell you, I’ve
been doing a lot of research lately for my own
dissertation work, and I’ve been researching
the theories that talk about student involvement, academic and social
integration of students. And what I’m learning, and
what the research is showing, is that students who are
more involved in college, in student organizations,
or in some way, whether they’re
working on campus, or they’re in a
student organization, or they’re doing research,
but as long as they’re involved and engaged
in something outside of the classroom, those students have the
higher propensity to actually persist,
be retained, and graduate. So it’s about student success. And student
involvement, to us, equals student development,
which equals student success. That’s excellent. So what I’m hearing is,
“Be involved, you would be better,
you will graduate.” Absolutely. That’s awesome. That’s incredible to hear. Can you tell me, what are
some of the involvement opportunities available
to our students at USF? There are so many. And we have some
right in our office, and in our area in the CSI&FS, where students can get involved
in fraternities and sororities, students can get involved in any
one of our programming boards, students can get
involved as Involvement Consultants and help
other students find their paths to involvement. But we don’t only
promote what we do, we also promote what
else is out there. There’s undergraduate
research opportunities in the Undergraduate Research Office. We’ve got opportunities
within new student connections and networks that they have
for students to get involved, especially our new
students coming in, and kind of getting
their feet wet, and feeling out what’s
going on on campus. And then we have the Center
for Leadership and Civic Engagement that has a lot of
opportunities to get involved off-campus, in the community,
do some community service. There are some philanthropic
opportunities there too. Residential Life is an area of
opportunity for involvement and engagement, there are arts
and theater opportunities, there’s just a plethora of
opportunities for students to get engaged in something that
helps them apply potentially what they’re learning
in the classroom, outside of the classroom. Excellent. And so there’s something
called the Campus Activities Board at the Center for
Student Involvement. Can you tell me what that is? So the Campus Activities
Board is one of our three programming board. So we have the Campus
Activities Board, the Campus Traditions
Board, and we also have the University Lecture Series. CAB–for short–for
Campus Activities Board, for short, is CAB. CAB is actually the board
that does a lot of the weekly programs that are constant,
so they’re doing two, three programs a week. We have our Movies on the
Lawn every other week. Every Friday night, students
can come out for (indiscernible) night out, and hang
out on a Friday night, and it’s usually either in
the Marshall Student Center, or somewhere outside of the
Marshall Student Center. We had a comedy show just
last Friday for folks, and Oscar night, and movies. And then they had
PatioTuesday, the first Tuesday
of every month, and that’s coming up
soon–Actually, next week, we’ve got one coming up. There’s a lot of
stuff going on. Really– Yes. Lots of stuff going on. And so CAB does a lot of those
programs and then some of the major concerts
like BullStock, that’s coming up. We have the Battle of Bands
coming up as well, so some special events too. That’s awesome. And so there’s a whole other
side to what you’re doing called Fraternity
and Sorority Life. And so I know we have a lot
of students talking about wanting to get involved
in these organizations, so can you give us a
quick overview of what is Fraternity and
Sorority Life here at USF? Here at USF, we have 50
fraternities and sororities. There are actually kind of
sectioned off in different councils,
governing councils and so we have the inner
fraternity councils which has fraternities, we have have the National Panhellenic Council, and the Multicultural
Greek Council has fraternities
and sororities. And then the Panhellenic Association has
sororities as well. And so within any one of
those 50 student organizations there, students
can be involved in leadership and service,
brotherhood, sisterhood, lots of networking
that happens. Our groups also do a
lot in the community. They actually, collectively,
in the 2015–Last year, in the last academic year,
they actually did about 45,000 hours of
community service. Wow. 45,000 hours collectively. That’s a lot of service
to the community. And they also raised almost
$400,000 for various agencies, community agencies, and some
national agencies as well. That is huge, huge impact
our students are having. That’s great. And so I guess the
answer is, “Yes, we want to see
those students get involved who are interested.” Absolutely. [Laughter] When can they join
a fraternity or sorority? So students here can join
as soon as they get here, for some organizations. So it’s really dependent
on the organization. Some organizations allow first
semester students to join, some organizations you’ll
have to wait until your second semester first year,
or your second year. And transfer students
are welcome always. Excellent. And so my note for those
who are watching too is, we’re a big school and
so Google is your friend, and you can just Google USF
Fraternity/Sorority Life, USF Fraternity
on the top page, it would most likely
be right over there. CSI&SFL And so I always
recommend Google for that. But now, it’s time for the
big question for our parents watching. What advice do you have for them
as they get ready to help their students with
this transition? You know it’s great that
I get every summer to do the parent
orientation sessions, the family and parents’
orientation. And so what I share
with them then, and I’ll share with
them today too, is to really encourage their
students to get involved. What they need to
do is support them and ask them questions such as,
“What are you interested in?” Or, “What did you do in
high school that you want to continue to do in college?” Or, “What didn’t you get
to do in high school that you want to try
out in college?” And this is a great
opportunity for students to just explore–Explore
different interests, learn something new,
gain a new skill, they can get a job
on campus as well. Getting a job on campus
is also being involved. A lot of the offices that I
rattled off earlier have jobs that students can have and can
get and then there are also student leaders in
those roles as well. So all the students
building doing all the programming in CAB,
and all the other programming boards,
they’re all student staff and student leaders. And so the parents can
really just encourage them to get involved and make
sure that they’re not getting too involved, and that
they’re balancing their time and making sure they’re
studying as well. But listening to them, seeing
what they’re interested in, asking them, “Hey, so
what have you done?” Or, “Who have you met? What organizations
have you checked out, the student
organizations across campus?” There are over 600 of those
student organizations. And so finding some time to
try and chat with them about what their interests are, or
what is it that they want to learn that’s new,
and how do they find that on the college campus. Awesome. And let’s say we have
a student visit campus, or they’re here, they’ve
moved in and they’re ready to learn more, where can
they find your office? Well, right on the second
floor of the Marshall Student Center, we’re in
the area of the Marshall Student Center that they like to
call the Student Life Tower, and our area spaces–We have
actually two spaces on the second floor of that Student
Life Tower in the Marshall Student Center. Well, thank you so much for
coming on the program with us tonight.
My pleasure. It’s always great to be here. And hope we’ll have you
back when we do Season 4. Yes. We’ll get you back. And so coming up next we’re
going to be speaking with the amazing and talented
Dave Kloiber, our Assistant Director for
Assignments right here on Housing Residential Education,
the person that sits on top all these processes to help
get you a spot to live here in our community, and so we’re
going to be talking with him. If you have any
questions, go ahead, type them into comments,
send them our way, and we’ll answer it
here in real time. But first, we have our
episodes of Deal Families and the next installment of
JacEats cooking show. We’re going to roll that. More Housing Live coming
your way after this. [Background Music] Today, we’re going to
be making one of my favorite breakfast dishes. Banana French toast. We’re going to start off just
cutting up some French bread, unpeel a couple of bananas. Now you want to mash up your
bananas real nice and smooth. For a recipe like this,
the amounts are really quite intuitive. If you like vanilla, feel
free to add as much vanilla as you want. Same goes for cinnamon. As far as the ratio goes,
I like to do about half as much nutmeg
as cinnamon. And I would just add
a little bit of milk, or a milk substitute of your
choice to thin that out. I would then get started
on preparing our blueberry compost. Just grab a handful
of blueberries, we’re going to add a little
bit of water and just about halfway cover
those blueberries. Now add about a
tablespoon of sugar. Get all these
distributed throughout, get a little bit
of a simmer going. Once these blueberries
have a nice simmer going, just lower the heat and keep
it covered for a few minutes. I’m also going to cut up a
lemon to add a little bit of fresh lemon juice to
the blueberry compo. It adds a real nice acidity which contrasts with the sweetness
of the blueberries. Now we’re going to get a
pan ready to fry up our french toast, and we’re going
to start putting the butter on the bread,
and get cooking. Now just add whatever oil you
have available to the pan, and the french
toast won’t stick. We’ll heat up our pan to a
little bit above medium heat. Now we’re going to
butter up our bread. Now we can start
frying this up. You’re going to want to cook
your french toast for about a minute and half, two
minutes on the first side. The second side will probably
cook a little bit quicker. So now we’ve got our
banana French toast. I’m going to pour some of this
delicious blueberry compo on it. I hope you’ve enjoyed learning
how to make this quick and scrumptious breakfast. Join me next time, and learn how
to make more delicious meals. Dear families, as your student
prepares to leave for college, they might be engaging
with fellow students in strange new ways. But I promise it
will all be okay. At the University
of South Florida, a stranger is just a
friend you haven’t met, and here our strangers like
to become friends on the USF Class of 2021 Facebook page. So if your student is talking
to a new person on Facebook, don’t fret. After all, you did spend all
these years teaching them right from wrong. Dear families, you may have
heard of this thing called SnapChat. Personally, I do not
quite understand it. The students send
pictures and videos, but they disappear
after 24 hours. Perhaps taking a selfie is
just their way of reminding themselves that they
are still alive. Then they share the image with
others to affirm that they do still exist both in the real
world and the internet world. Dear families, you may visit
someday and discover that your student has bruises on
the forehead or knuckles. Please don’t be concerned. They have made many friends
using social media, but friend-making can sometimes
come at a physical cost. The good thing is, if a
friend-making injury occurs, it will likely be
posted on social media, so you can contact them and
discuss the importance of spatial awareness, and a
respect for basic physics. Alright, we are back. For those of you just joining
us, my name is Gregory Bowers. I work with Housing &
Residential Education here at the beautiful University
of South Florida in Tampa. We’re with the
incredible-edible Dave Kloiber from Housing Assignments. Dave, how are you doing? Doing great, Greg. Dave, you’re a long time veteran
of the show, aren’t you? I am. Proud of it. I’m glad that we can
just wheel you out here and dust you off, and make you
answer questions for everyone. [Laughter] I’m glowing
today, so it’s okay. Okay. Are you ready, Dave? Yeah. I’m all polished up. Alright. You can see the shine. [Laughter] So–This
is awkward. So, Dave, we know that
room selection is coming, and this is actually a new
process for entering freshmen. And so, just kind of
give us an overview, what is this animal
called room selection? Well, it’s a–It’s our
first time process here for our new students. We’re actually–For
many years now, we’ve allowed our
returning students to go in, into our system,
see what’s available, and actually place
themselves into a room. But we said, “Hey, why not
do this with our incoming students as well?” And so for the
first time ever, they’re going to have the
opportunity to log into our system beginning on March
27th, which is a Monday, and the first group of
students will be able to log in, see what’s available
that they can choose from, and actually
assign themselves. And if they have friends,
and they’ve made arrangements with their friends,
even assign their friends to their apartment,
or suite, or room. You’re telling me that they
just get to pick their own room? Yeah. They can look through the
almost 1500 to 2000 beds that would be available, and see
what’s available, and say, “That’s the one I want,”
and actually place themselves into that room. That’s very cool. And so I imagine, though, that
they can’t just login on the 27th, and just do
it on Day 1, right? No. They do have to
complete our five steps. The fifth step is the
assignment process. But the first
step is obviously, they need to an application,
they need to tell us they’re interested in
living on campus. Number two is to pay that
application fee that we’ll be charging
within 24 hours–Well, one business day of
completing the application. Number three is–And they
don’t have to do three, four in order. They can do four
or three first. But number three would be to
verify that their required immunizations have been
submitted to student health services and approved. And number four is that they’ve
registered for orientation. And then finally,
they can log in and actually
select the room. Excellent. So there are a few steps, and just to clarify that Dave said,
you have to let us know you’re going to apply. You don’t call Dave’s
cell phone and say, “Hey, I’m going to live
there.” Dave is like, “Awesome.” And then you’re
like, “I live there now, ” and Dave’s like, “Yeah. No.” That does
not work that way. You got to make
sure to complete the housing application at
usf.edu/housing, right? That’s where they go… Exactly. …and complete the housing
application, all the steps. And so also when
you’re on our website, just click Housing
Application up at the top, select First Year Students,
and then you’ll see the five steps to
living on campus, and also the room
selection process info. I’ve just got a question–
Can I say something about the application? Oh, please. Because they’re doing
room selection this year, they won’t see Room
Preferences on the application. And so because they’re going
to be looking for the rooms that they want, so they
don’t need to tell us their preference. I’m glad you mentioned that. Because you pick
your own room, so you don’t need to
tell us what you prefer, because–Pick your own room! And so that’s pretty cool. Exactly. Silvio would like to know,
is there a particular time to reserve a space on campus? We’re going to be notifying
all students as they are ready to select their rooms. So on the 27th, we’ll begin
that process at 10 am. In order to prevent people from
really wiping our system out, and all trying
to hit it at once, we will stagger some starting
times for people to start. And we’ll start with those who
completed everything first, and then move on to those who
complete their steps later. And we’re talking maybe 50
new people every 30 minutes. But they’ll be getting
that information. Once your time starts though,
you’ll be able to select any time thereafter,
up until the end of June. Excellent. Well, thank you, Dave. Thank you so much. We’re out of time,
unfortunately. Alrighty. There’s never enough Dave
time, but– I’ll be back. … But we might have some time
after the commercial break. If you have questions
send them our way now. We got a short break for you,
we’re going to be back with more USF Housing
Live after this. Maple Hall, housing
approximately 230 residents, futures suite-style living,
with double occupancy rooms where four residents
share a bathroom. Parking for Maple
is abundant as well, with parking lots to
the South and East. Laundry for Maple is
located inside the building. Maple has large Pod
areas very similar to those in Juniper Hall
and Poplar Hall, where residents can
socialize, study, or attend one of the
many programs happening throughout the year. Every resident is provided
with a bed, desk, chair, and dresser. Kitchens featuring stoves
and ovens are on every floor. The Marshall Student
Center is a beautiful, 230,000 square foot facility
that is dedicated to student success. Standing tall, overlooking the
University of South Florida campus in Tampa, the
Marshall Student Center, as called the Marshal Center
or MSC, is a hub of activity, entertainment, and education. Lunchtime? Students enjoy an expansive
food court on the first floor of the
Marshall Center. The MSC also features
a Beef-o-Brady’s where students gather to
catch the latest Bulls game, or shoot some pool. And it’s always free. Behind the pools tables, is
USF’s very own radio station, Bull’s Radio. Here, students get involved
and make connections whilst they gain on-air
experience running talk shows and mixing tracks. On the first floor, students
will find a retail area that has services such as
the Wellness Center, computer store,
and dining services. If you like to volunteer, get
to the CLCE when you arrive. USF’s oval theater on the
second floor of the Marshall Students Center is home to
various presentations and events produced by,
and for, the student body. The Ball Room hosts
dance, lecture sessions, and other engaging activities. Conference and meeting rooms
are available throughout the MSC for student
organizations to rent. The third floor is home
to the Center for Student Involvement, where you can
start or join a student organization, or learn
about campus events. Enrich your college experience
by visiting New Student Connections, the Office of
Multicultural Affairs and Education Abroad. Student Government, located
on the fourth floor of the Marshall Center provides
students with a way to have their voices be heard. To relax, many students
visit the Sky Pad, a lounge where you can play
games, hang out with friends, or focus on homework. At the Marshall Center,
there’s never a dull moment. It’s the hub of student
activity on campus, and it’s just one more thing
that’s great about being a USF Bull. Right, we are back. My name is Gregory Bowers
of Housing & Residential Education here at the
beautiful University of South Florida in Tampa. We’re the best place to
live, the best place to work, and the best place to learn. And congratulations to Tom for
sneaking in a question right at the end of the show. When is signing up for
orientation available? That would be on March 13th. You would be able to reserve
your orientation session. And you know what that means? That means you’ve completed
all of your housing applications steps if
you did the first four. Confused? You might be. Go to usf.edu/housing,
and you can look up all the housing
application info there. But, yes, that is one of the
steps to make sure that you can engage in room selection
which will open on March 27th. So make sure you do that,
make sure that you are ready. For those of you who want
to continue with us on Housing Live, we’re
going to have many more great guests joining us,
and that’s going to be next Monday,
March 6th. We’re going a little early,
because Spring’s break is the week after, and I think our
whole crew is going to be out on the beach. And so–Yeah, it’s beach
time for the students. And so we’re going
a little early. But that’s going to be March
6th at 6 pm right here on facebook.com/usfhousing
and youtube.com/usfhousing. I want to say a big thank you
to our guests for coming on the program tonight, we
hope to have you back in the future. And for those of you watching,
make sure you do join us for future episodes. And if you have any
questions, well, join us in the USF Class
of 2021 Facebook group, and ask away, we’re
happy to help. Well, that about does
it for all of us here, and there’s just
one last thing: [Go Bulls! ] [Background Music]