This Guy is like Gru with the Ultimate Mancave Missile Silo Home

This Guy is like Gru with the Ultimate Mancave Missile Silo Home


(mysterious music) – We’re, uh, 40 foot underground. In a nuclear missile
silo in upstate New York. It’s a decommissioned
silo that I purchased almost 20 years ago. All its beauty lies in its purpose. I had no intention to buy a missile silo. What I was looking for, a long time ago, was a space that had
architectural utility about it. I like utilitarian spaces. So if you can imagine there,
this complex is made up of two main buildings. One is the launch control
center, which is a cylinder of two levels which is
about 40 foot underground. And the other is the missile silo itself which is 185 feet deep
by 52 feet diameter. And the upper level is the living quarters of the launch control center. That’s where the crew basically lived and spent the 24 hours. The lower level of the control
center is the working end of the missile silo. It houses all the communications equipment and the launch control console. There’s a utility tunnel
and that takes you through to the missile silo itself. The silo was in an extremely
dilapidated condition. When I first arrived here, it was open, all the doors were open,
including the silo doors. Both the silo and the control
center were completely full of ice so each time that I came out here, which is only in April and October, I would choose a project
and I’d concentrate on it and I would get it done. One of my intentions when
I transformed the space from obviously a very utilitarian space to habitable living space was to retain as much of the
original aesthetic as possible, but make as livable as possible. I didn’t want to destroy
anything that had been left that was original. Previously the living
area of the control center had concrete walls and vinyl tile floors. Neither of which were very
soft or warm or attractive, so I left the vinyl there and I laid a commercial
grade carpet over the vinyl to help warm and soften the space. And the other thing that I did
was line the concrete walls with a quilted fabric that
would both stop the cold from the concrete, but
also soften the sound. Areas that I changed
in terms of paint color were certainly the lower levels of the launch control center. As you can see, this area is
presently gray and orange. Previously it was, I’m not
quite sure what you’d call it, Air force Green. (laughs) Been a long and arduous
process of restoring it to the point where I can live here. One of the most important
transformations in the space was to actually be able to sit down inside the launch control
center and finally relax. To finally feel as if this is a point from which I can now work. And that I think was probably
when we flipped the power on, flushed the toilet and put
the kettle on. (laughs) The space is quite large and so it doesn’t have a
claustrophobic or oppressive feel about it at all. It’s incredibly quiet and
so it’s a perfect place to sit back and reflect. A lot of people say that
this is not real estate, this building is a way of life for me and they’re quite right. I’m still to this day amazed
that it’s been 19 years, almost 20 years since I’ve owned it and I’ve never grown tired of it and I’ve never wanted to sell it or even in a fit of frustration. I’ve never even gone there,
I’ve always maintained that it’s very much a part of me. (mysterious music)