Steve Biko on the Daily Violence of Poverty and Oppression

Steve Biko on the Daily Violence of Poverty and Oppression


I’m not talking about words I’m talking
about the violence in which people are baton charged by police, beaten up. I’m
talking about police firing on unarmed people. I’m talking about the indirect
violence you get through starvation in the townships. I am talking about the
hopelessness the desolation of the transit camps. Now I think that all put
together that constitutes more terrorism than the words these men have spoken
here but they stand charged and White society is not charged. So your answer to
this so-called ‘naked terrorism’ is to provoke violence
in the black community? No. Our movement seeks to avoid violence. But your own
words call for direct confrontation. That’s right we demand confrontation.
Isn’t that a demand for violence? Well you and I are now in confrontation but I see
no violence. But nowhere in these documents do you say that the white government is
doing anything good. Well it does so little good my lord that it is not worth
commenting on. But surely that approach inflames racial hatred and anti-whiteism?
My Lord, Blacks are not unaware of the hardships they endure or what the
government is doing to them. We want them to stop accepting these hardships, to
confront them. People must not just give in to the hardships of life they must
find a way even in this environment to to develop hope. Hope for themselves, Hope for this country. Now I think that is
what Black Consciousness is all about not without any reference to the white
man. To try and build up a sense of our own humanity. Our legitimate place in the
world. sometimes alone I look outside know when
you go the shadows I mean the sound
noctus to drop the Dhokla smart