Minnesota 4-H: Growing True Leaders: Projects Showcase

Minnesota 4-H: Growing True Leaders: Projects Showcase


(ukulele music)– [Libby] The cornerstone of
4-H is project-based learning.
– 4-H gives young people
and opportunity to really
delve into their
passions and to discover
what they’re passionate
about in the first place.
Reflect upon it, get good at
it, and then show the world
what it’s all about,
through their communicating
about what they’ve learned.– [Libby] I couldn’t
agree more with Jennifer.
Each year I’m blown away at
the creativity of 4-H-ers
and how they use their projects
for educational purposes.
Today, I checked out two
really cool projects.
The first being an escape
room about zoonotics.
My kids and I are
eager to try it out.
But before we enter, I got
the back story on this project
from the University of
Minnesota Extension intern,
Kyle Rickeman.So 4-H has always prided itself
on being on the cutting edge
of educating the public
on what they need to know.
Zoonotics is a very
hot topic right now.
Can you tell us a little
bit about what zoonotics is?
– Yeah, So zoonotic
diseases are any diseases
that can be passed
between humans and animals
or animals and humans.So it can go either way.Some examples of zoonotics
diseases would be like
salmonella, E. coli, influenza.And we’ve heard a lot about
E. coli this summer actually,
around Minnesota in the lakes.So that’s a big example
of a zoonotic disease,
outbreak technically,
around our area, so.
– And so Kyle, I know that
you’ve got a lot going on here
over the course of the fair,and you’re trying
to educate people.
Tell me about what
you’re doing here.
– So at the fair, we
actually over the summer,
I came up with a zoonotic
disease escape room
for people to do.I brought it to 10 different
county fairs in Minnesota
and now we have it here at the
State Fair for people to try.
So what it has to do,
is you do an escape room
and it is related to
zoonotic diseases.
So you have to find
the animal that’s sick
and what virus and what
zoonotic disease it has, so.
– Okay, so have people
been receptive to it?
– They have, yeah.We also have a survey at the endand most everybody is learning
what zoonotic diseases mean,
which a lot of people didn’t
know what it meant at first.
Then they’re also
learning the best ways
to protect themselvesfrom getting zoonotic
diseases as well.
– So, at the end of
this, you told me,
people are not stuck inside.Everybody gets to
learn how to get out,
so the idea is that they
actually retain the information
and learn and retain.
– Yeah.
– And so, what have
people’s reactions been?
Have they been having fun?Have they been
having a hard time?
Have they learned a lot?– Yeah, I think their reactions
have been really positive.
They’ve been learning a
lot, for the most part.
And I think it’s
not frustrating,
because it does give it clues
on the whole way through,
so they are able to get out.But it’s enough challenge
that it makes it fun as well.
– Well cool.So we have some kids that
will be going through this,
with myself, so I’m excited
to see just how easy it is.
– (laughing) Yeah.– Or hard it is.
– Yeah.
– And we’ll see
if we can get out.
We might need your help though.– Okay, sounds good.
– We might need your help.
(upbeat music)We had a fun time
in the escape room.
Kyle definitely
gave us a challenge.
The 4-H-ers work on raising
awareness about zoonotics
doesn’t stop with
the escape room.
Another team of 4-H-ers,
led by Theresa Gustafson,
created a series of
informational videos.
Theresa has taken zoonotics
to the next level.
She’s a 4-H-er that was
proactive and put together
a series of videos.If you could tell us about
those videos and your project
I’d really appreciate it.– Yeah.So, we created a
series of four videos
and we, as in my team.I have two other
girls on my team
and we’ve been working on
this for quite awhile now.
We wanted to help stop the
spread of zoonotic diseases
and we decided that we
were going to do that
through the media.Because a lot of the times,
it’s just a poster in the barn
and people don’t
really notice those.
And so we took to Facebook,
Instagram, and YouTube,
and we put all of
our videos out there,
at Team Future
Generation Minnesota,
if you wanna check it out.And we created videos
that tell you about
what a zoonotic disease
it, how you can get them,
and how you can prevent them.– Well that’s fantastic.And I heard through
the grapevine
that it’s actually
an animated series.
Is that right?– [Theresa] Yes, it is.– So you’re aiming a
little bit younger crowd.
– Yes, we are.We figure that if we
can kind of get to them
while they’re young,
then they’ll remember
and they’ll just keep
kinda passing it on.
– Very good idea.Very smart.So, why is zoonotics
important to you
and why do you think
it’s important to 4-H?
– Zoonotics is important
to me because I am a farmer
and when our animal
gets sick at the fair,
it brings it back
to the entire herd,
and then everyone gets sick
and it’s kind of a bad deal.
And that’s kinda why it’s
important to farmers.
But for 4-H, I think it’s
important just because
it’s for everyone honestly.It’s not just like the animals
that you see at the fair,
the farm animals.It can also be your cats
and dogs and household pets.
– [Libby] Next on my list of
projects, is this old camper,
sitting in the heart of the
4-H building at the State Fair.
The Skamper has been given a
complete interior overhaul,
worthy of a HGTV designer.So tell me a little
bit about this process.
How did you come
up with this idea?
– This idea took me three
plans to come up with.
– Okay.– I was like, I wanna
go kinda farm-y.
And then I was like, no
it was small when I got it
and I wanted to
make it feel big.
So I was like,
we’re just gonna go
with a comfy, artsy
she-shed kinda deal.
– [Libby] Got it.– So I was like, let’s just
get rid of the whole bathroom
and the closets and
everything else.
I was like, we don’t need them.I got rid of all
that and I was like,
a fireplace would make it
feel really cozy in here,
so I put in some fireplacesand then some comfy
chairs and everything.
– Well I will tell
you what, my friend.
Good job, it absolutely
gives it a comfy feel.
This is the kinda place thatwhen you’re at the State
Fair running around,
it would be a great place to
just come in and take a nap.
– Yeah.– Wouldn’t it?
– Yes.
– Take a little time out.It is very, very cozy,
very comfortable.
So as far as laying this out,and actually doing the
construction of it,
were you out there with the
saws and the tape measures
and all that kinda good stuff?– Yes, I was out there with
everything, doing everything.
It takes a lot, it’s a
lot of learning curves
to figure out how to
do different things.
And I was out there breaking
down walls everyday,
when I first go it, and just
gutting the whole thing,
’cause it was super
nasty in here.
– Yeah, how long
did it take you?
From demo day to completion?– It was just over
two months, so.
– [Libby] Okay.
– Two months and two weeks.
– [Libby] Labor
of love, for sure.
– [Audrey] Yeah.– [Libby] And your plans going
forward with this beauty,
is to sell her, right?– [Audrey] Yes.
– [Libby] Okay.
– I’m going to sell it
and use some of the money
for my future projects.– Okay.– And then I’m hoping to donatesome of the money
to my 4-H club.
– I love it, that
sounds fantastic.
(upbeat music)As I said before, the
variety and creativity
of these 4-H-er’s
projects is amazing.
While 4-H projects are one
of the public demonstrations
of 4-H in action, an
often overlooked fact,
is that 4-H is programof the University of
Minnesota Extension.
– University of
Minnesota Extension
is a state-wide organization.We are a part of the universityand 4-H is our youth
development program.
– [Libby] Dean of
Extension, Bev Durgan,
is no stranger to 4-H.She herself participated
while growing up in Montana.
– I showed beef.And in fact, my nephew from
Montana, who was in 4-H,
was with me a couple
days ago at the beef show
and he looked and
me and he goes,
“Oh, I miss my beef
Steer” (laughing).
So, you know, I
think all 4-H-ers,
it was a great time for them,and so they think
abut that time and go,
“Oh, I wish I was
still doing that.”
– [Libby] Dean Durgan
agrees that creative freedom
is a huge benefit of 4-H.– You can be in
the beef program,
but you can also
be self-determined
that you wanna give
a demonstration on whatever.And you can do that in 4-H.And so, 4-H is a
very unique program,
in that it’s really the 4-H-er
decides what they wanna do.
They can be part of a club,they could do it independently,they could be in an
after-school program,
they can go to camp.