How to Care for Your Catheter (Male) at Home

How to Care for Your Catheter (Male) at Home


Welcome to the catheter self-care teaching
video. At the end of this video, you will learn: how to keep your catheter clean, how to empty your catheter bags, how to clean your catheter bags, how to change your catheter bags, how to prevent a catheter-related infection. A urinary catheter, sometimes called the FOLEY catheter, is a thin tube that drains urine directly from your bladder into a collection
bag. This catheter is held in place in your bladder
by a small water-filled balloon, so it will not falling out. As part of your recovery from your surgery,
you will need to go home with a catheter, and will need to take care of it at home. Taking care of your catheter… keeping your
catheter area clean. Wash your hands. Gently wash the skin around the catheter and
the catheter tube with plain soap and water. Wash the tube in a downward motion. Instead of soap and water, you can also use
baby wipes. If needed, pull the foreskin of your penis
back to wash around where the catheter is coming out, and pull it back over the head
of the penis when you’re finished. Pat the area dry with a clean towel. Add a layer of polysporin to the tip of the
penis where the catheter is coming out. Do this every time that you clean your catheter
area. Clean your catheter at least two times a day,
once in the morning and once at night. Wash your hands. You will be going home with two types of collection
bags, the day bag and the night bag. The day bag will let you to move freely during
the day. It can be worn under your clothes by strapping
it to your leg. The second bag is the night bag, which should
be used for when you are going to sleep as it can hold more urine than the day bag. In addition to the catheter cleaning, you
can shower with your catheter and the collection bags. If you are able to stand in the shower stall,
shower with the day bag on. If you are unable to safely stand in the shower,
use a bathroom chair with the night bag, and let that bag either sit on the ground of the
tub, or hook the bag where it will stay BELOW your hips. The bags are waterproof, so you do not have
to worry about getting them wet. You can dry the bags with a towel when you
are done, but be careful not to touch these areas. You CANNOT have a bath while you have your
catheter. Emptying your catheter bags. You should empty the day bag when it is about
1/3 to 1/2 full, or if you feel that the bag feels too heavy on your leg. To empty your day bag … Wash your hands. Place the blue end of the bag over the toilet
and turn the valve to the left (counterclockwise) and drain the urine into the toilet. Do not touch actual opening with your fingers. You can open and close the port by keeping
your fingers on the valve. When the bag is completely empty, turn the
valve to the right (clockwise) to close the valve. Finally, wash your hands. For your night bag, empty it in the morning
when you wake up or when it looks full. To empty your night bag … Wash your hands. Unhook the drainage valve from its clip at
the bottom of the bag. Place the valve over the toilet and slide
the valve to the LEFT to open. Do not touch the opening with your fingers
and just let the urine drain into the toilet. When the bag is empty, slide the valve over
to the RIGHT to close. Finally, wash your hands. If you forget which direction it is to open
or close the valve, this is also written on the bag. How to clean your catheter bags. Pour a teaspoon of vinegar or one pump of
unscented liquid soap into the bag from where the bag would connect to your catheter. Run the bag over a small stream of water,
fill it to about 1/3 full. Swish the bag around. Then empty it through the valve. Changing between the day and night bags. To change between the bags, you need to know
how your catheter is connected to the collection bags. The catheter itself is just the tube that
comes out of your body. Everything else is the collection bag. Wash your hands. Empty and close the bag. Wash your hands again. Put a towel in-between the bag and your leg. You can also do this in the washroom. Use two fingers to pinch your catheter tube
closed so that the urine doesn’t leak during the bag change. Keep it pinched until you are done changing
the bags. To take the bag off of your catheter, gently
roll the catheter tube away from the bag. DO NOT pull on the catheter or the bags. Gently rolling on the catheter will help you
get the bag off. Take the bag that you wish to put on. Take the BLUE CAP off of the end so that you
see the clear part of it. Connect the bag. Do not throw the blue caps away. Keep the blue cap to cap off the bag that
you will not be using. You may now unpinch the catheter and let the
urine continue to drain out into the collection bag. Wash your hands again. The steps are the same when changing the day
bag to the night bag, or changing the night bag to the day bag. You can leave these bags in the bathroom with
the BLUE CAP attached to the tip. Try to leave them where the opening of the
bag is not touching anything. How to prevent a catheter-related infection. To prevent a catheter-related infection, there
are seven key steps that you will need to follow. Number one – always wash your hands. Wash your hands before you touch the catheter,
and wash your hands after you touch the catheter. Number two – drink water if it’s right
for you. If you can, drink at least one litre a day
or 4 cups of water. This will help you keep hydrated, and help
flush out any remaining blood clots from your surgery. Number three – clean your catheter at least
two times a day, once in the morning and once at night. If the catheter or the area around it becomes
soiled, clean the catheter area again. Number four – use the night bag when you’re
going to sleep. The night bag holds more urine than the day
bag, so you won’t have to empty it during the night. Number five – to prevent infection, do not
let any urine drain back into your bladder. Always keep the bags BELOW the level of your
hips. This will allow the urine to drain away from
you. If you are going to lie flat, use the night
bag and keep it below your hips. Number six – don’t let the catheter tug
on you. The catheter should always hang loose so that
it doesn’t pull on you when you’re resting or moving. Number seven – read the information sheet
that will be given to you by your nurses. The information may help you understand more
about your catheter. Having a catheter is part of your care and
recovery after your surgery. Your healthcare team is here to support you. If you have any questions or concerns, ask
your doctor or your nurse.